Lessons From Indonesia: Always There

sammy 600 final
Haha…I’m laughing to myself.

šŸ˜€

SERIOUSLY.

The things I will do to put off posting on Mondays.

Oh, don’t misunderstand me, please…I want to share these stories.

But sometimes I have to get over myself first, and it takes random things like shoveling FEET of snow and wasting my brain on old NKOTB videos (thanks to my bloggy sister who posted that one) šŸ˜‰ before I’m quite ready to go there.

The truth is that my Monday morning snark really has nothing to do with this chapter.

Right now I have a lot of words to choose from…of course, that will change as the weeks go by. Well, unless I write more chapters, which will probably happen…there are even a few more ideas saved in the notes section on my phone right now. :)

So I asked my hubby yesterday which one I should share…and he immediately said, Sammy.

He hasn’t read my book…in fact, there are only a handful of friends who have seen a few pieces of it and one friend who’s read the whole thing. Tobin is reading it right along with the rest of you, and yet, somehow he knew there would be a chapter about this.

He knows me and he knows the many things God used to shape me during our time in Indonesia. They weren’t always easy things…and this is definitely one of them that is still painful.

A slight disclaimer: this is oh-so-very-UNedited. And it made me laugh when I read the two scenarios that I managed to combine. But to me it makes sense. And even if it doesn’t to you, I hope the truth here will resonate.

It’s one I need today…and every day.

Thank you for being here. I mean that from the bottom of my heart.

_____________________

20

It is the Lord who goes before you. He will be with you; he will not leave you or forsake you. Do not fear or be dismayed.
Deuteronomy 31:8

I havenā€™t made it a secret that Indonesia was not easy.

It wasnā€™t something I dwelled on as we lived the day-to-day, but there were definitely moments when it became a blunt, in-my-face reminder.

There were moments of homesickness that made me hide under a blanket, curl up into a ball, cry every tear inside meā€¦and eventually bring myself to the point of realizing that since I couldnā€™t will myself ā€œhomeā€ that I would have to crawl out of my cave of despair and face life again.

I always came out, and life always went on, and it even included smiles.

I will never forget a certain day in Decemeber of 2005.

Weā€™d been in the country less than five monthsā€¦definitely still members in good standing of the newbie group.

But we also wanted to break out of that somewhat and learn to live in this place that was our home and would be just that until God gave us a definitive calling for something else.

And as part of our ā€œbreaking out?ā€

We hopped on the motorbike, determined to find a certain restaurant I had eaten at once.

One. Time.

One time, a little restaurant, in a city of about three million people.

We had a vague idea of where it was, but compounding that very vagueness was a maze of one-way streets. A drive that should have taken us fifteen minutes left us still on the bike ninety minutes later, the sun beating down, the dreaded farmer tan forming on my arms, and our spirits sinking.

Oh, and we had a form of bike butt that I canā€™t even talk about. Because, for some reason, I remember the pain, and it still makes me cringe.

It was one of the worst feelings to be so lost and have no clue where we were going. (Or, if we were going to get there. Ever.)

Anyway, more and more and more wrong turns later, and after almost two hours of driving around (with a gas stop for a very empty tank), we finally arrived at the restaurant. Ate lunch. Did a little shopping at the outlet store next to it. And left.

Feeling a euphoria mixed with some form of what-on-earth-just happened-here.

Frustration could have ruled the day, but we were both in the same place, I think.

We were finally, really living in this placeā€¦finding our independence.

And it felt spectacular.

But was that day easy? Absolutely not. As much as it is etched in my mind for eternity, it is not a day I want to repeat. Ever. (Well, I would repeat the lunch-and-shopping part of itā€¦those were definitely aspects I always enjoyed.) :)

There were so many days and even weeks like thatā€¦times when we were left to figure things out or trust that it would all work out even when we had no clue how that might happen. Things always did work out, but sometimes not without a lot of confusion, frustrationā€¦and tears.

Perhaps one of the hardest things we experienced was so much like this first accountā€¦and yet so different.

Weā€™d just begun our third year of Indonesia life, and we were no longer the new kids in town. We were moving into the mentor role and had just spent the week prior with new staff, helping them set up their houses.

It was a good place to beā€¦and we were truly enjoying life and where God had placed us. We were also coming off of a summer spent in Indonesiaā€¦the one summer we chose not to return to the U.S. It had been a difficult two months but was not without blessings, eitherā€¦including a trip to Bali to celebrate our 5th anniversary.

Weā€™d also had some transparent talks as a couple about our relationship with God and how we both felt there were areas we could improve, specifically with spending more time in His Word.

For the previous two weeks weā€™d been intentionally rising early to do this in the morning rather than late at night as our eyelids began to droop.

We were being intentionalā€¦and we were growing.

Thatā€™s why we were blindsidedā€¦We. Just. Didnā€™t. See. It. Coming.

It was a Wednesday morning, and I had just sent my fourth graders to their specials class. I was attempting to dig through the stack of grading that had somehow miraculously appeared on my desk, just two weeks into the new school year, when my husband walked into my room.

I took one look at his face and knew instantly that something was very, very wrong.

Sammyā€™s gone.

Those words still bring tears to my eyes as I, once again, see the image in my mind of my husband standing in front of me, tears in his own eyes.

Though our pembantu (house helper) was at our house and it was broad daylight, someone had stolen our precious golden retriever without anyone seeing.

To say that the days that followed were horrible is an understatement. We couldnā€™t eat, couldnā€™t sleep, couldnā€™t functionā€¦and yet all of our school responsibilities went on as expected. My students became accustomed to a teacher who did all the things asked of her but did so with red, swollen eyes and a spirit that seemed to be sinking lower with each passing minute.

We spent every free moment combing the city, blanketing it with fliers, and taking locals with us who would translate for us as we explained to pet stores and the two “stolen” dog markets that there was a big reward, and we would not call the police. We just wanted our dog back.

And in between those things and teaching, we would just try to breathe…somehow.

But it almost felt like helpless floundering.

We felt so lost.

I remember the Sunday that followed because I just couldnā€™t take it anymore.

The pain was too great, my heart was too heavy, and my God seemed too far away.

I found myself face-down to the floor, my forehead pressed against the ever-dusty tile, and wept to that God. The One Who had promised that He cared for His children, the One Who said He cared about the robins and sparrows, the One Who had promised Heā€™d always walk by my side.

I donā€™t know how long I stayed in that position, but I know it was for a while because I had a pretty good mark on my forehead for a few days. And I canā€™t even tell you everything I said between my tears, but I do know that I told God, Sammyā€™s Yours. I want him back, but heā€™s Yours.

Two days later, Sammy was returned to us through a series of events that I know my Father orchestrated…but that one is deserving of its own chapter.

Againā€¦that feeling of complete bliss but mixed with some wondering, too, of what on earth had just happened to us.

Having our precious doggy-boy returned to us was a day neither of us will ever forget, but is it a day or a week that we ever want to repeat?

I donā€™t think that question even bears the need for an answer.

And weā€™ve since revisited those emotionsā€¦emotions that can still be strong enough to bring tears. Iā€™ve combed through the story in the past, searching for something deeper that God may be still trying to teach me, and I think Iā€™ve finally found it in the midst of another season when I just don’t see.

Itā€™s not earth-shattering, itā€™s not going to shock any of you.

But it is Truth.

There are times in life that are just hard. And while we cry and hurt and wonder, we must never, ever forget Himā€¦He is always there, even when it doesnā€™t feel like it.

Today my Sammy is still his crazy, loud, wonderful, golden-retriever selfā€¦and he is a living reminder of this Truth.

_____________________

The stories Iā€™m sharing are about a place and people who are in my heart foreverā€¦I never want to paint a negative image of them or their amazing country. Therefore, I ask for your grace over each word and story. I pray that I share these words well.

The above is an excerpt fromĀ Lessons From Indonesia: On Life, Love, and Squatty Potties. All words and stories are my own and are copyrighted through Amazon publishing. Feel free to read them, but please ask for permission before sharing them. :)Ā 

Thank you!

Sig

Comments

  1. Oh so beautiful. Loved this one!!

  2. So thankful you got him back! Nice to see a happy ending!

  3. Hey Mel, God has blessed you with a powerful skill in putting life into written words, communicating Emmanuel in the snowy Mondays of February. Thanks for being real in front of us.

  4. Oh what beautiful words from a beautiful heart. I love that your sweet Sammy returned.

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